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malagan

malagan
 
© Australian Museum 
photographer: AM, Photography Dept - Carl Bento
 
Summary:
E000582 - 0/5/1887, malagan, Tabar Island, Tabar Group, New Ireland Province, Papua New Guinea, Pacific
Item Name:
malagan
Label:
Marumarua malagan figures are used in commemorative malagan ceremonies to honour a personís memory after he or she has died. A marumarua is an image associated with an ancestral life force known as tadar and is passed on to the next generation during the ritual context of the malagan ceremony. These figures are created to be displayed during a malagan ceremony in order to honour the people that the dead person was married to. Malagan figures are made by specialised carvers to specific designs and forms which are used in ritual context only the one time. After a malagan ceremony, the figures are usually taken to specific sacred areas where they are left to rot. [Ref: Mike Gunn, - Long Gallery text label discussion - 6.6.2017 YCH]
Keywords:
religion
dance
ceremony
funerary
Place:
Tabar Island
Region:
Tabar Group
Province/State:
New Ireland Province
Country:
Papua New Guinea
Collection Area:
Pacific
Museum Department:
Anthropology
Registration Date:
/05/1887
Registration Number:
E000582
Associated Stories:
New Ireland, Malagan scultpture and ceremony - construction
New Ireland, Malagan scultpture and ceremony - symbolism
New Ireland, Malagan scultpture and ceremony - general
Images
1:
 
© Australian Museum 
photographer: AM, Photography Dept - Carl Bento
2:
E000582. Malagan figure. Front side view. Tabar Island, New Ireland Province, PNG. Purchased Captain Farrell 1887. 
© Australian Museum 
photographer: AM, Photography Dept - J. Steele
3:
iE000582+01 - Malagan wooden female figure. This is 'La Gas' style image also known as "ges" or "Ngass". The pointed ears amd slanted eyes represent bush spirits. Right hand holding right breast, left hand holding extended clitoris. Pith hair, inverted hands, toes projecting downwards. Left hand eye missing [ref: Mike Gunn] 
© Australian Museum 
photographer: AM, Anthropology Dept - Yvonne Carrillo-Huffman